— 49 —
What is, is; and It is impossible for the same thing to be, and not to be, not universally assented to.       §4. But, which is worse, this Argument of Universal Consent,
which is made use of, to prove innate Principles, seems to me a
Demonstration that there are none such: Because there are none to
which all Mankind give an Universal Assent. I shall begin with the
Speculative, and instance in those magnified Principles of Demon-
stration, Whatsoever is, is; and ’Tis impossible for the same thing to be,
and not to be, which of all others I think have the most allow’d Title
to innate. These have so setled a Reputation of Maxims universally
received, that ’twill, no doubt, be thought strange, if any one
should seem to question it. But yet I take liberty to say, That these
Propositions are so far from having an universal Assent, that there
are a great Part of Mankind, to whom they are not so much as
known.
Locke Hum I, 2, §4, p. 49