— 496 —
As useful as to confound the sound of the Letters.
      §11. These learned Men did equally instruct Men’s Under-
standings, and profit their Lives, as he who should alter the signifi-
cation of known Characters, and, by a subtle Device of Learning,
far surpassing the Capacity of the Illiterate, Dull, and Vulgar,
should, in his Writing, shew, that he could put A. for B. and D. for
E, etc. to the no small admiration and benefit of his Reader. It being
as sensless to put Black, which is a Word agreed on to stand for one
sensible Idea, to put it, I say, for another, or the contrary Idea, i.e. to
call Snow Black, as to put this mark A. which is a Character agreed
on to stand for one modification of Sound, made by a certain motion
of the Organs of Speech, for B. which is agreed on to stand for
another Modification of Sound, made by another certain motion of
the Organs of Speech.
Locke Hum III, 10, §11, p. 496